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Bachelor Degree in Plant Science and Biotechnology

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  • Course description
    Training in Plant Science and Biotechnology takes you to the area of scientific research dealing with vital issues impacting today's world. Challenges to future scientists include the growth, development and genetic makeup of plants, the enhancement of the environment and the safe cultivation of more food using less space, less fertilizer and fewer pesticides. These issues must be explored in order to preserve and improve the quality of life on our planet.

    As a result, extensive career opportunities exist in genetic engineering, tissue culture, plant breeding, research technology and teaching. A background in Plant Science and Biotechnology is an excellent foundation for entrance into graduate school as well.

    Agriculture sustains human life on Earth. The challenge is to meet the world's food needs into the 21st century and beyond, while preserving Earth's natural resources. By becoming a specialist in Sustainable Crop Production and Marketing/ Plant Health Management, your knowledge, techniques and applied experience will be specifically focused to prepare you for a rewarding career. Positions can be pursued in sustainable agriculture, agricultural extension, agribusiness, sales, conservation, organic crop production, produce buying/brokerage, plant pest monitoring and management, government, teaching and research.

    A degree in Plant Science and Biotechnology takes you to the area of scientific research dealing with vital issues impacting today's world. Challenges to future scientists include the growth, development and genetic makeup of plants, the enhancement of the environment and the safe cultivation of more food using less space, less fertilizer and fewer pesticides. These issues must be explored in order to preserve and improve the quality of life on our planet. As a result, extensive career opportunities exist in genetic engineering, tissue culture, plant breeding, research technology and teaching. A background in Plant Science and Biotechnology is an excellent foundation for entrance into graduate school as well.

    By becoming a specialist in Hydroponic Crop Science, your knowledge, techniques and applied experience will be specifically focused to prepare you for a rewarding career. Positions can be pursued in hydroponic crop production, teaching and research.



    HT 1101 

    Exploring Horticulture, Science and the Environment  

    The objectives of this course are to define the field of  

    horticulture, to indicate what horticulturists produce,  

    to explore the various disciplines and areas of spe-  

    cialization and the challenging career opportunities in  

    business, science, education and industry. 2 hours  

    Lecture—2 credits  

    HT 2003 

    Fruits and Vegetables for Food, Fun and Profit  

    This course tells how horticulture is a delicious,  

    healthful diet source, gardening pastime, physical fit-  

    ness routine, science, business, profession, art, indus-  

    try, and a life sustaining career learning experience.  

    1 hour Lecture—1 credit  

    HT 2005 

    Plant Physiology  

    A study of the life processes of plants with laborato-  

    ry experiments designed to illustrate the physiochem-  

    ical principles controlling plant growth. Prerequisite:  

    Botany of Vascular Plants. 2 hours Lecture and 

    3 hours Laboratory—3 credits  

    HT 2101 

    Botany of Vascular Plants  

    A survey of the Plant Kingdom with emphasis on vas-  

    cular plants. Principles of seed plant structure and func-  

    tion are presented with stress on the plant’s relationship  

    to its environment. Prerequisites: Biological Science I. 

    2 hours Lecture and 3 hours Laboratory—3 credits  

    HT 2112 

    Commercial Fruit Production  

    A study of the commercial production and handling  

    of the deciduous tree fruit crops. Production and  

    marketing of fruits are studied in reference to the  

    selection of sites, soils, choice of varieties, plants,  

    pruning, cultivation, fertilization, pests, spraying and  

    dusting, harvesting, grading, packing, storing, and  

    marketing. Non-majors must have permission of the  

    Department Chairperson. 2 hours Lecture and 3 hours  

    Laboratory—3 credits  

    HT 2211 

    Commercial Vegetable Production  

    A study of the culture of the principal vegetable  

    crops, emphasizing production of vegetable plants in  

    hotbeds, coldframes, greenhouses and fields, variety  

    choice, soil adaptation, planting, fertilization, cultiva-  

    tion, pest control, harvesting, storage and marketing.  

    Non-majors must have permission of the Department  

    Chairperson. 2 hours Lecture and 3 hours  

    Laboratory—3 credits  

    HT 2235 

    Principles of Sustainable Agriculture  

    The course in sustainable agriculture embraces sever-  

    al variants of non-conventional agriculture (alterna-  

    tive, regenerative, ecological, low-input) and pulls  

    together these practices into systems that are prof-  

    itable and environmentally sound. It addresses the  

    serious problems of high energy costs, groundwater  

    contamination, soil erosion and risks to human health  

    and wildlife from pesticides. Offered Spring Semester.  

    2 hours Lecture and Discussion—2 credits  

    HT 2240 

    Organic Crop Science  

    This course provides the student with practical experi-  

    ence in the organic production of fruits, vegetables,  

    herbs, ornamentals, field crops and turf. Environmental,  

    social, and political issues concerning organic crop pro-  

    duction will be addressed. Comparisons to convention-  

    al production will be made. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours  

    Laboratory— 3 credits  

    HT 3000, 4000 

    Selected Topics I and II  

    Special projects designed to meet individual needs of  

    students in the specialized fields of agriculture.  

    Projects will be arranged on a one-to-one basis with  

    a department faculty member and with the approval  

    of the Department Chairperson. Total Selected Topics  

    credit accepted toward graduation is limited to 

    2 credits.3 hours student/faculty instruction per  

    week—1 credit each  

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